Linoleum that is easier to maintain and clean — in 73 colors

linoleum that is easier to cleanWhen it comes to linoleum, the big name in the game is Forbo/ Marmoleum. I’ve also posted about Armstrong’s lineoleum. Recently, though, I found another manufacturer, Johnsonite, whose Harmonium xf linoleum was awarded a Green Good Design Award in 2009. I think this alternative should go on our list, especially since Johnsonite seems to have invented a special top-coat that is apparently easier to clean and maintain — an issue for traditional linoleum. Link: Johnsonite Harmonium Linoleum

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Comments

  1. Gavin Hastings says

    I will be checking this out!

    Years ago I installed a red Marmoleum kitchen floor. Beautiful, but it took a great amount of work to get it that way.

  2. Sara Paul says

    My friend who owns a floor covering business tells me that Marmoleum has a peculiar odor that some people do not like. Anybody experience this? Walked into a new/model home the other day with it in the utility room and upon opening the front door I smelled something unusual. Just curious.

  3. Lynn-O-Matic says

    Sara, we have Marmoleum floors. They do give off a slight scent when they are first installed, but it is a much more earthy, organic smell–linseed oil and such. Far more pleasant than vinyl or paint offgassing, and it goes away quickly.

    They do require more maintenance than we have really given them. You are supposed to reapply the top coat every year and we are too disorganized. But I love the floors. They feel warm and natural and they are quiet, and they are still beautiful even without proper maintenance.

    My boss just installed Marmoleum floors in the restrooms here at work. They are gorgeous, and make the rest of the place look shabby by comparison.

  4. Jeff says

    I just installed vintage pale green linoleum with a white stone “fleck” as kitchen countertops and ordered the stainless snap on cap from New York Metal.

    Mine is an Armstrong material from the early 60’s, a Habitat find locally in Michigan. I will be looking into the top coat product to keep it in shape, since it is currently flat and without a finish.

  5. johnny dollar says

    has anyone done any side-by-side comparison with the johnsonite with this special coating, and traditional linoleum? it would be great to know if it would be worth the upcharge.

  6. tikitacky says

    Although you have definitely covered Johnsonite for us all, I thought many readers might be interested in the specifics of locating pastel colored tiles with a confetti pattern. Johnsonite came to the rescue for a pink and turquoise kitchen. I have samples of every shade of pink I’ve been able to find by every manufacturer I could get a lead on, both tile and sheet lino. They’re all either reddish (think bologna), or apricot pink, or contemporary hot pink. Same with turquoise shades – nothing seemed to fall between sea green and robins egg. It’s not that we don’t know who makes flooring, it’s just daunting to navigate through hundreds of tiles separated by product line and residential/commercial use, and we can become lost before discovering all there is to offer. The only true pastel pink I was able to find can be seen in the Johnsonite “Karim Kolors” line and is called “Kink”. The aqua shade is called “Koise”. It took a very long time to find this. I’d actually received two deliveries of Johnsonite samples before I stumbled upon Karim Kolors. I thought you might want to include mention of that specific line in your next article about flooring options. If you already have, I am sorry I missed reading about it. It would have saved me months of searching. Seriously.

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