34 designs of breeze block in Jack LeVine’s collection — let’s look at each one

decorative retro concrete blockOh, how the retro world loves breeze blocks. That is: Decorative concrete blocks. No one can know for sure how many designs were made, but I bet that Jack LeVine‘s collection, displayed like art in the back yard of his lovely Las Vegas home — gives us the best count we have so far. How many breeze blocks are in his collection? He says: 34. When I visited his house as part of Nevada Preservation Foundation‘s Vintage Las Vegas Home & History Tour a few months ago, I tried to photograph them all. Finally: Here’s the stash to ogle — and covet. Get yer scrolling finger ready, set, go!


decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete blockdecorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block retro-breeze-block-5 decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block decorative retro concrete block

Okay, so scrolling and counting, I think I get only 28. In any case: It’s WILD, isn’t it, how many of these designs were made!

Retro Renovation readers are kinda obsessed with breeze blocks; my stories on them are among the most popular in terms of search etc:

 

pam-and-Jack

Jack LeVine was one of the first midmod-lovers I “met” when I started the blog. It was SO FANTASTIC to meet him in person before my remarks launching the tour. We hugged three times! Jack remains super active in the mid mod community in Las Vegas — in addition to being a realtor, he is on the Board of Directors of the Nevada Preservation Foundation.

Hugs, Jack!

More: Another recent story on Jack’s collection!

Be-Safe-graphic2.3

Get our retrolicious free newsletter.

Newsletter-sign-up-2NMAS

Get our retrolicious free newsletter.

Comments

  1. Carolyn says

    I’m glad he chose to include those that were damaged (fleur-di-lis). How creative to take this humble material and fancy it up in so many ways.
    Too cool.

  2. ineffablespace says

    Some of these make their own statement and I think some of them would be much better as a multi-block screen to appreciate the whole pattern.

    • pam kueber says

      Agreed. But it’s a collection of often salvaged pieces — multiples not available — I’m a little confused by your comment ineffable….

      • ineffablespace says

        Oh,
        I think as a collection of salvaged pieces each block is great as it is.

        But originally, they were meant to be read as a “unit” in a larger pattern, and as individual blocks some of them are less effective than others.:you need them in multiples to see a more complex pattern

      • Red Reed says

        I believe they mean some of them would be even more impressive if we could see the pattern the blocks make as a matching group. Just wishful thinking to see the effect with a large grouping. Some, like the fleur-de-lis make a big impression on their own.

  3. lynda says

    That is what I call a perfect thing to collect. No clutter in the house, and there can’t be too many out there to find. I think it makes a great look for the backyard and you still get to have the thrill of a good hunt!

  4. kara says

    We just got back from a 10 day vacation in LA. We saw breeze blocks EVERYWHERE. I have a great pic of it used at the Stahl House. When I posted pics of the Stahl House on my FB page, many of my “non-mcm” friends said “Is this your Air B&B?”.

    As if.
    🙂

  5. Joanne says

    I’m actually loving all the shelves set into the brick wall of their yard. I’m assuming that needs to be done when the wall is being built and not something you can add on later? I’ve seen this done with interior brickwork before but not outside.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *