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What is this 1960s countertop made of? Targinol? Luster Rock?

1960s quartz countertopWow, does anyone know about countertops like these? Becky recently bought a time capsule and her french provincial kitchen (I’d call it) includes these countertops. Reminds me of these Fritz floor tiles. Anyone work with this back in the day who knows? Kind of, an early-days version of Silestone or the other composite-quartz countertops sold today. I love it!! And that kitchen, too (nix the carpet and get a counter-depth fridge.) Note: These are photos from the walk-through before Becky bought the house. She is talking about gutting — argh! Becky: Live with the house a while, I implore you — I sure bet you can learn to Love this House You’re In!
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1960s french provindial kitchen

  1. pam kueber says:

    Thank you, Lorri! We are chasing permissions so that we can show archive your Lusterock research. Many thanks!

  2. Christi says:

    Hey Jeff, I know you posted this a couple years ago, but I grew up with a kitchen table just like this in the70’s, in shades of orange that I am desperate to find again. Would you know where I could find one?

  3. janis says:

    I have one of these tables in pink! It was my table growing up, so I think we got it around 1973. When I was a little girl, I thought it was cool, and I spent countless hours learning every shell and stone in it. As I got older, it simply emabarassed me. It has been in storage since the early 90’s, and now I think it is the coolest thing ever, and cannot wait to have dinner with my kids around this table. I am working on getting it out and getting a base built for it. If anyone knows somone on the east cosast who can build a base for it, let me know.
    I have been searching high and low for someone who knows what I am talking about. I am so glad I found this site!

  4. Jane says:

    Yes, I have this counter top installed in my kitchen in 1985 and I still love it. It was a small company that made them and I don’t think he is still around with no sons to carry on. To keep clean its always by feeling the top. To smooth a very fine steel wood to buff and pledge to shine. The pledge keeps it easy to clean and food wipes off smoothly. Mine is made of sea shells installed by Sears.

  5. jennifer B says:

    I need a small piece of luster rock. Do you still have any? or know where we can get a small piece. We have a counter top made of luster rock and a small corner piece broke off, only about 1-3 sq feet. I have a picture of the counter top I can send to you.

  6. Kim Jasper says:

    We just bought a 1972 home that is full of this stuff. Complete double sink vanity. It is one piece–the counter top and sinks–crazy interesting stuff. Both bathrooms are fully done in this stuff; shower stall, bathtub surround and its in perfect shape. My husband hates it! 🙁 Will be selling it in the future when we get to the remodel part of the bathrooms. Feel free to contact me kimberlyannjasper@gmail.com if anyone knows of any interested parties.

  7. JoAnn says:

    I have a 42 inch round kitchen table with a wrought iron base made of Lustre Rock. It was purchased in Chicago in the 1960’s, has been used since the day it was bought and still looks brand new. I get compliments on it every time someone sees it for the first time.

    Also, a friend built a 4 bedroom, 4 bath home and used this product for all of the vanity counter tops. Still beautiful. I wish it was still available.

  8. Layne says:

    My kitchen counter top and my shower surround are made of lusterrock. I absolutely love the look and feel of the material and probably will never replace either. The material makes the shower feel warm and inviting and actually feels warm to the touch. It gives me a nostalgic feeling and makes my house my home!

  9. Ted says:

    My dad ran a TV repair and Luster Rock business in the 60’s and 70’s in Eastern Indiana. I remember he roughly quit both before I was a teenager. I remember when I would visit at age 3-4-5 etc. the large 55 gallon drums of the resin, and all these different (also smaller drums kind of remembering not metal – perhaps strong paper?).

    Anyway he had probably 30 to 50 different piles of rocks to choose from, I used to pick them out and play with them and he would let me decorate sometimes the stuff he was working on . Used a table to pour a base of resin into to create a small topcoat, then put the rocks in, and then continue the pouring of what ever resin (or resins) to harden. I remember he made this for table labs, kitchens etc… He was older and past away in the 80s while I was in my teens. My mom and him seperated when I was 2, so I didn’t spent a ton of time with him growing up, but I do remember going on some house calls etc.

    Lastly he made it into building siding as well, without the resin, so the wall was course. Basically did it on plywood that was mounted to the building with the luster rock dropped into the base resin on the bottom so you would only see the rocks.

  10. Rick Fahnel says:

    Hi All. I used to work for a cabinet company in Wisconsin and made these countertops. (Vanity also) It was made out of a polyresin and had a plywood backing to it to prevent warping. Also aided in installation. You could put just about anything in it from mother of pearl chips to marble chips. we once made one that had a guys name spelled out in silver dollars. Anyway, it was state of the art at that time. Very durable and beautiful. If it did crack, you simply got some resin and catalyst and filled the crack.
    Sand it smooth and your done. Maybe this product should make a come back?

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