We have our winners in our “Love The House You’re In” collage contest

Congratulations to Amy Hill and Cindy Friday — the two readers who won a “Love The House You’re In” collage — featuring them and their houses — specially created by collage artist laureate Mel Kolstad. Mel’s been doing a Love The House You’re Inn collage-a-month for the blog. But, we thought we’d take it one step further by getting readers involved. On Tuesday night, I used the random number generator at random.org (I  to select the two winners. Their numbers came up! (I did not try to “judge” the comments — everyone’s were great — I selected the winners randomly.) Mel has started working with them on their collages. Thanks to everyone who participated. Your comments — AMAZING! We love our houses, that’s for sure! 

Here were the rules:

  • Leave a comment below, answering the question, “Why do you love the house you’re in?”
  • You must sign up for my weekly newsletter.
  • Residents of U.S. and Canada only.

Additional details:

  • I’ll pick two winners from among the comments with a random number generator  at 8 p.m. on April 19. (I will cross-check that they are newsletter subscribers, and if they are not, I will pick again.)
  • If you win, you will send up to three high-resolution images to Mel, she will create your collage and mail it to within a month. The collage is mounted on a 4″x4″ wood tile with a notch for hanging – it’s very cool!
  • Pam will confirm with you whether you’d like it featured on the blog or not – your choice.
  • If this all goes well, I’ll continue the contest every month.

What do you think? Wanna win? Why do you love the house you’re in? And… be sure to be signed up for the newsletter.
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Comments

  1. Betsy Ward says

    I love my 1957 split-level for so many reasons, here are a few; 1) a clean asymmetrically angled roof-line. 2) a turquoise blue AMF full-size pooltable that I’m sure they built the family room around. 3) a pink and gray bathroom. 4) especially, the very unpretentious neighborhood it sits in.

  2. Annie B. says

    When I walk through the sliding glass portals of the house I love and live in, I am transported to a comforting and familiar world of mid century so thoroughy it’s as if Tinkerbelle has sprinkled me with fairy dust. It’s taken years, but it’s been a labor of love to make something so un-mid mod into “as mid century as you can get with no money”.

    Our much-loved home is simply a very plain little 1970’s rectangle which has been filled with every original piece from the era which the retro thrifting gods have seen fit to bestow upon me.

    This little abode began as nothing more than a weekender’s place on the Carolina coast which was put together beginning in the late ’60’s with scrap, junk, and cast-offs. Many of these cast-offs have turned out to be some ot the most remarkable mid mod fixtures: Lightolier bathroom lights, funky Persian tile lino, and a sliding glass door the brand of which graced the Eichlers. It’s a crazy quilt becoming a little more of an atomic boomerang each day.

  3. Anne says

    I love my 1957 mid-mod because walking into it is like walking into a house that someone built and left (mostly) perfectly still for all of these years, and yet, it gives one the perception that these walls could share some fun stories. I love the huge windows that show off the beautiful trees, I love the mahogany paneling and built-ins everywhere, I love my original kitchen with its highlighter yellow countertops and Thermador oven. Mostly, it just fits our family, and lets us be who we are. Sure, there are some things that need work or need to be restored. But just as this house lets us be ourselves, we will help it become itself once again. One project at a time!

  4. bob terrill says

    we’ve lived in our house about three yrs now, and we’re still changing the way it looks; we want everything to live in harmony- h wakefield buffet, the lighted daylight donuts sign, the knoll chair that looks like a pair of lips, and the painted velvet pictures, to mention a few- all kinds of styles can go together- you just have to make them talk to each other; forgive the faux metaphysics, i just couldn’t figure out any other way to say it; it’s a fun house, and we love being here; it goes perfectly with a gin and tonic; thanks, and thanks for the great work, bob terrill, ft collins, colo