midcentury-asian-doorLast July we got our first look at Cindy’s 60s ranch home in Holyoke, Massachusetts. A real midcentury time-capsule beauty that needed some work – and which she has been accomplishing with great sensitivity to its original lines and features. In August last summer, I went to visit Cindy, as we live only an hour away. How delightful to be sitting here today – in my cold computer cave, 20 degrees outside – and see proof that warm July and August will be here soon enough. Several photos from Cindy’s house were featured in an earlier post, but I took a bundle more, featured here today. In particular, I was entranced by the many small, yet very carefully

selected, details within the house – from that beautiful Asian-style doorknob — to the porch light – to the can lighting – and on and on. Oh – the “Goldwater in ’64?” It’s a bumper sticker I picked up at an estate sale and brought for Cindy as a little housewarming. For the graphics, we didn’t talk politics! And wouldn’t you know it, it matches her kitchen.

Click through for 28 wonderful photos in all!

midcentury-post-lantern

I must admit, right up front, that I am a terrible guest when I go to see reader homes. I immediately become the absent-minded professor eagle-eying every feature outside before I can even get up to the doorway to shake hands. I think Cindy understood, because we’d met before. Apologies again, Cindy, I’m working on my interpersonal skills especially when doing retro recon. But oh my goodness: Look at the pole lamp. A real beauty! Likely from Moe or Progress or Thomas Industries.  Fantastic!

midcentury-outdoor-light

And there’s more — a matching outdoor wall sconce. If the tour had stopped right here I’d have been happy.

midcentury-living-room

Walk inside Cindy’s front door and there is delight in every direction. She’s painted her living room walls a lovely butterscotch color. Love the rug, and the modern sofa! Glance at the ceiling, we’ll get a close up of those recessed can lights in a moment.

60s-marble-fireplace

A fabulous marble brick fireplace separates the kitchen and dining area from the living room. No question, the more I see these gorgeous fireplace structures, the more I want want want. And these white bricks are fantastic. I wonder how much it would cost to replicate this fireplace today.

new-flooring-for-a-60s-ranch-house

Cindy added this floor. It is Amtico resilient tile (vinyl, Cindy?), and what I found so cool about it was the flooring contractor used “welds” – some sort of plastic flooring pieces – between each tile – this gives the effect of grout and is an option to butting the tiles up against each other. A really nice look to consider. However, Cindy says that the contractor may have used too much adhesive because it bubbles up and is a bear to clean.

1960s-tile-bathroom-countertop-including-recessed-metal-cabinet

We’ve seen Cindy’s bathroom before, but in this close up, I want to point out the recessed metal cabinets right behind the sinks. The long shiny metal installation includes swirl-around toothbrush holders flanking each side. And in the center, a recessed cabinet with sliding mirrored doors. AWESOME! This kind of installation was made by companies like Miami-Carey. I actually bought one on ebay last year. It arrived broken in a million pieces. And then the seller shafted me on the refund even after I sent it back to him. I bet I might be able to replicate/find this product for readers today; stay tuned, it’s on my list. A wonderful way to add space if you have a countertop run. And note: Cindy has made some really well-done cosmetic updates to this bathroom since August. Look for that post next week!

midcentury-chandelier

An original 60s chandelier in Cindy’s kitchen. Simply divine.

colonial-style-sconce

I believe this was in the hallway.. I love the modern lines in a colonial lantern arrangement. A truly wonderful fixture.

60s-recessed-can-light

These recessed eyeball cans were throughout the living room. These can still be found among the companies identified in our Lighting Page.

retro-renovation-kitchen-in-gray-laminate

I gotta show this again. Cindy completely renovated her kitchen. The cabinets are laminate – a totally authentic choice, especially as you enter the 60s … she has a granite countertop and it looks great … and she stenciled the backsplash herself (goes under heading of: Some Therapy). Notice the butterscotch ties to the living room, too.
vintage-hall-light

A simple but just lovely hall light with that little added something: Starbursts in the glass.

globe-light-on-the-patic

Even on the patio – a milk glass-meets-disco globe! The people who built this house know how to live – and had some dough-re-mi at their disposal!

vintage-ceiling-fixture

Another wonderful kitchen light!

new-retro-sconces-in-the-kitchen

Cindy added these new pendants (from Lightolier, I think she told me) to her kitchen.0

60s-intercom

Yes: Wood panelling (cherry, me thinks) in the living room, and a Nutone speaker system.

vintage-laundry-chute

You’re looking at wonderful vintage 60s Romany Spartan tile — and a laundry chute! I love laundry chutes. Don’t have one, goshdarnit. There was a really cool one in the St. Louis time capsule house – photo coming soon.

vintage-wall-clock

Vintage clock.

1960s-ranch-house

A real dream house. Thank you, Cindy, for you wonderful hospitality and for finding this great home such a caring owner!

Categoriesmodern
  1. Diana from Pittsburgh says:

    Hello,
    Does anyone know where I can get reproduction recessed eyeball cans similar to Cindy’s?
    Thanks
    Diana

  2. NorthsideCJ says:

    Great place Cindy! I love that clock. I want one for my collection. And the bathroom vanity looks amazing. I still can’t believe the kitchen was done by hand, it looks very good. like a really cool wallpaper! I’m extremely jealous of the Goldwater bumpersticker!

  3. sablemable says:

    Hey, Cindy!

    When you did your stenciling, did you use regular wall paint or paint designed for stenciling?

    Thanks for the info and you are especially talented (and patient)!

  4. Holyoke Cindy says:

    Hi All,
    When I did the stenciling I used regular Benjamin Moore latex paint and a tiny roller from a craft store….there are four separate colors so I had to go over it three times after I did the base coat on the sheet rock. (see why Pam said I needed therapy?) I guesstimate the project took about 50 hours. I am constantly worried about water damaging the sheet rock backsplash and someday will figure out a way to tile it with that pattern.
    The clock and coffee table came from tag sales!

    1. Pam Kueber says:

      Hey Cin – to clarify, I think I said your painting job was “some therapy” – meaning a good way to zen out – a positive thing. Well, sort of! 🙂

  5. Barclay says:

    You have a great eye – and I fully appreciate taking a vintage house, being brave enough to remove some of the “original” fixtures, surfaces, and features, and replace them with newer, but entirely appropos and better looking alternatives. Great job!

  6. jane says:

    Cindy, your home is dreamy! When I was growing up in the 60s we had neighbors with a similar fireplace and the kids would always pose in front of it for those classic Christmas cards.

    About your kitchen and the fear of water damage to your artwork. Have you thought about fitting clear plexiglas sheets over it? I have a collection of vintage tablecloths that I protect with plexiglas.

    I am in love with this site and all of you who share my love of retro everything. I grew up in a very traditionally styled home and dreamed of living in a “modern” house. I am working on my pink and orange retro remodel funky mountain retreat and will post my photos as soon as I can clean up and take them.

  7. deebee says:

    Cindy,

    Did you ever find the name of the designer/maker of your kitchen pendants? We just purchased a vintage light like yours and I can’t seem to find it’s origin. I’m hoping you can help.

    Thank you. Beautiful work on your home!
    -deebee

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