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‘Hang It All’ vertical, flippable, portable barbecue grill – super cute graphics

hang it all vintage barbecue

Sherree – Re-discoverer of the Hang-It-All

There sure was a lot of innovation going on in post-World-War II America when it came to that important topic: Barbecue grilling.  I certainly recall, as a young child in the 1960s, that camping and barbecuing were a regular part of our life. Dad always had a pickup with one of those camper shells that fit over the truck bed and even wrapped way up high above the truck cab with with a sleeping area and window toward the front. Are these still street legal today?

On the weekend, we’d hop in the truck/camper to go fishing at Big Bear Lake. In the summer, we’d drive to North Dakota to visit family. I have fond memories of me, my brother David and maybe even my cousin Timmy stretched out on top of the world in that camper shell thingie over the truck cab, watching the road ahead and puzzling the mysteries of life. In postwar America, gas was cheap, we loved our cars, and the interstates were being completed so there was, literally, a whole new America to visit. Get your kicks on Route 66. And on the road and in the great outdoors: We grilled.

Which gets me, finally, to Sherree’s latest wonderful oddity — woddity — barbecue grill:  the Hang It All. Sherree — who has her own blog, Midcentury Thrifty Gal — writes, and sends lots of photos, which I tortured her for:

Hubby and I just purchases this strange Barbecue/Charcoal Grill called a Hang It All. It is vertical!

The meat is placed in wire baskets and hung vertically on each side of the vertically placed charcoal briquettes. The cute tray (with illustrations on how to use it) is placed underneath to catch the drippings.

I don’t think it was ever used; the tray is nearly perfect. The whole thing is on a black metal stand with legs (almost like tv trays) that can sit on the patio or grass . I just thought it was really unusual.

We don’t see a date on it and I could not find on online, although I did find the tray. I am guessing early 60’s by the colors and illustrations on it.

I asked if there was paperwork and speculated it was for camping. Sherree replied:

There was no paperwork. Must be a camp stove or apartment/balcony grill?


It actually could hold a dozen hot dogs on one side and 6-8 burgers on the other. Not sure how good it worked; the ashes would fall onto the tray. You would flip the baskets when they were cooked halfway through 🙂

And, I asked Sherree where she found it, how much she paid, and whether she would use it. She quickly replied
We bought it in the basement of an old antique mall for $10.
Looking closer at the tray graphics, it can be used vertically as well. You can flip the legs upside down to make handles to carry it.
And the  top can hold a small saucepan and coffee pot!
Probably won’t use it. I will either sell it or use it for display 🙂

Thanks!

Thank YOU, Sherree aka Midcentury Thrifty Gal, for sharing. I love this so much.

Is this a great country. Or what.

  1. Eleanor says:

    For Brian K.
    Firetower is temporarily available on ebay. If you google “Firetower charcoal bbq ebay” the seller will come up. Good Luck.

  2. richard peplin says:

    my grandfather invented and mfg the Hang It All.I have at least one new one. When I was Pres of my grandfahers company an old employee told me she still had a new one in the box.I was always appreciative of the people that worked for the company,so for a bit I cooked lots of burgers on it at lunch for them.I’d still like to reintroduce it some day as original,graphics and all. Thank you for recognizing it’
    Sincerely,
    Richard C Peplin Jr.

      1. Richard Jones says:

        My father cooked almost everyday on one of these grills, I would be honored to own and cook on one for my family. If you know of one or two for sale I would really like to buy them. Please respond by email and let me know if you know of one for sale or if you don’t please respond saying so. Much Thanks, Richard

        1. pam kueber says:

          Richard, no buying/selling on the blog or it becomes chaos. I recommend watching ebay and etsy like a hawk.

      1. pam kueber says:

        Any info you put in a comment proper will show up for everyone. No one can see your email unless you post it within the comment. This is part of why there is no buying/selling here on the main blog. Quickly becomes chaos. I can not be an intermediary.

  3. Reuben Porter says:

    We have one and still use it. Was received as a wedding gift in 1971 and love it. Our children would like to buy one for themselves. Do you know how they can purchase one?

  4. JIM says:

    If anyone has a “hang it all’ for sale at a reasonable price I would be interested in it. We, my family of 7. used one for many years while
    family camping in the 60’s and 70’s. thank you, Jim A.

    1. pam kueber says:

      Jim, My friend Jean of Retro Genie Northampton may have one. Look her up on google, give her a call.

      Note: No buying/selling here on the blog or it becomes chaos…

  5. john v. plante says:

    Hello: When people cooked in fireplaces or open fires they suspended meat in front of or beside the fire with a long dish underneath to catch the drippings. The meat does not char that way. Now lets go to France. Those dummies still do that, in some of their Bistros. The finest chicken livers, pork chops and steaks I ever had was cooked that way with no seasonings except a very lite sprinkle of salt. When are we know it all gonna do the same. Black carbonized meat is not good for us nand tastes like crap. Those vertical broilers I saw were all cast iron except for 1 aluminum one. Having been there in France so many times. and seen them on sale, I gotta be a moron for never having bought one. They were all priced very reasonably also. You can’t find any for sale here, That’ what I’m looking for right now on line.

  6. Gary says:

    We had one of similar design (60s early 70s) where the main body was made of cast iron… I wish I knew what happened to it because it worked great…

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