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Wilsonart Daisy retro countertop laminate — in Envy and Ice colorways

Deborah loved Wilsonart’s Daisy laminate — a reissue of a 1970s pattern — so much that she used it in two bathroom — one features the  gray”Ice” colorway, the other, the green “Envy” colorway. Yes, I’m green with envy — I love this pattern! 

Deborah wrote:

Hi Pam,

I have read your blog here and there for several years. First of all, thank you! I love mid century design, and your posts have helped me greatly in my research to find products to use in my own house. In looking for bathroom countertops over the past couple of years, I found the unique retro designs from Wilsonart, which were not available in my local stores. After finding a local fabricator, he was able to order the laminate and make my countertops. I used the Daisy pattern, in both Envy and Ice, in two different bathrooms.

I just came to your site tonight looking for flooring ideas and saw the link for the bathroom countertops. I was able to see the project using the apricot Daisy submitted by one of your readers, as well as the restaurant with some original counters/tables. Wanted to share that I also love this pattern! 

Debbie I.

Pam notes: Wilsonart Daisy is easy peasy to find and buy — right on Home Depot’s website here. You can get 8″x10″ samples direct, free, from Wilsonart.

Read more:

  1. jc says:

    What’s the deal with the backsplash pattern? Is it a “backsplash style” variant of the same pattern? The linked articles only show the “random scatter” pattern used on the main counter top.

  2. Geonimom says:

    Lovely! Had no idea it came in gray, though? Whenever I see someone using the fun Wilsonart Daisy pattern here, it always makes me smile….takes me way back to my high school days. My school was built back in 1973 and had the orange colorway of it was on all the countertops in their ladies rooms. It was there in 1980 when I graduated – but I’m guessing they’ve probably torn it out by now and installed some blah, greige countertop in its place by now, though. Here’s a blurry pic a friend snapped of me “primping” in front of it in my senior year????. 4

  3. CarolK says:

    My cat would choose that laminate to redo our countertop in the bathroom (when we re-do the bath in a couple of years) if we were putting the lavatory in a counter. I want a good old fashioned wall hung sink with legs and towel bars though and a nice old fashioned big medicine chest with sliding mirrors for doors cut into the wall. The pink nude tub can stay and the vintage pinky tiles. I need some decent sconces though. The cat’s name is Daisy, btw.

    I was watching Rehab Addict yesterday afternoon and Nichole Curtis was restoring her grandparents’ mid ’50s ranch. She was lamenting that it would be quicker to get marble cut for the kitchen that to order the laminate she really wanted. (Her grandma liked marble anyhow.) She did use the old hardware for the cabinets. There was a den with knotty pine panelling that an uncle had added this panelling with deer on it. She was going to gently tear out at least the deer panelling, but it grew on her so she reused it. Nichole doesn’t trash anything that can be saved. She also urge viewers to please save their pink (and green and blue…) bathrooms!

    1. Carolyn says:

      CarolK – the best part, in my opinion, were the photos of Nicole’s Grampa and her dad and uncles ad assorted others working together to make the house happen. These were all just regular guys who each knew a little something. WI author Mike Perry calls them “old guys” – not age related but they either knew how to do something or they knew how to figure it out.

  4. Karin says:

    These laminates are very cheerful. I’m happy to hear Rehab Addict and Nichole Curtis are respectful of the midcentury aesthetic. It’s about time there was a decor show that didn’t involve gutting midcentury homes and turning them into cookie-cutter shrines to beige, taupe and granite. It’s so wasteful. I just can’t watch those anymore.

    1. CarolK says:

      The D.I.Y. Network also has Restored with Brett Waterman where he aims to restore old homes. Often he works with homes about 100 or so years old, but he has also restored some mid-century homes. They both try to keep as much of the original material in the house as possible. In one home that Brett restored, he unearthed the original linoleum in the kitchen and sent the stove the Antique Stove Heaven for restoration. He was so impressed by that old Wedgewood range and even more impressed that the family wanted to keep the stove and the linoleum. If he can and it’s appropriate to the house, he’ll make the refrigerator look like an old-fashioned ice box. The homes that Brett works on already have owners while the one that Nichole restores are vacant. I did see one episode of Nate and Jeremiah By Design where they worked on a mid-century home and, while they did use quartz on the countertops, it was quartz that did not look like stone but laminate and edged that quartz with aluminum. The worst show in terms of home “restoration” is Property Brothers. Ugh!

    2. Ann Marie Eisele says:

      @Karin, I totally agree! I feel sick thinking about the mid-century homes being converted into what I call the neo-farmhouse look where there’s marble everywhere in white and grey. The charming colors of pink, baby blue and orange are completely eradicated. Sad!

  5. Mary Elizabeth says:

    Beautiful bathroom counters, Deborah! Did you ever answer the question about the backsplash–tile or another laminate?

      1. Mary Elizabeth says:

        Yes, I see the links now. Great idea to mix backsplash tile with laminate counters. We did that in our kitchen.

  6. Elizabeth from Texas says:

    I love these daisies, too! We’re using the blue ones on a built-in desktop in the housekeeper’s room in our 1963 MCM! (May it ever be finished…)

    1. Carolyn says:

      Housekeeper’s room – like Hazel’s? Or Alice’s? Oh, my! Think how handy that extra room would be for today: sick kid, in-law’s, college/armed forces guests, foreign exchange…

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