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Vintage 1966 kitchen — St. Charles mixes wood and metal, and harvest gold and avocado arrive!

1966 St. Charles Kitchen cabinets

How about this fabulous 1966 St. Charles metal and wood kitchen?

1966 St. Charles kitchen

1966 St. Charles kitchen
click to enlarge photos especially the first one!

  1. Cool how it combines wood with metal. And French Provincial wood, no less.
  2. This was part of the transition to kitchens that looked like furniture – like the rest of the house, which was now encroaching as ‘open concept’ design truly takes hold.
  3. Awesome oven and range. So Samantha Stevens!
  4. Great mix and match of colors and materials as you move from space to space – showing that your retro kitchen does not have to be all matchy-matchy – works especially if you have a large space to work with, keeps the eye moving.
  5. Peek at the wonderful green patterned sofa, and painted panel walls in the adjacent family room.
  6. And here we have — harvest gold and avocado together! By 1966, the 70s have arrived!

One change that I would recommend: I think it’s much smarter to have the working sink positioned between the fridge and the stovetop, rather than at the far end. Much better for working efficiency.

Want to start re-inventing this look for yourself? There a large set of St. Charles cabinets, in Denver, just posted this week on the Postwar Steel Forum (top nav bar) that has a similar look. Snap them up, and you are well on your way to funky town!
St. Charles kitchen cabinets for sale in DenverSt. Charles kitchen cabinets for sale in DenverSt. Charles kitchen cabinets for sale in Denver

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  1. Ronn says:

    PS Maggie,

    You and everyone else will have to excuse my typos. I have mild Dyslexia, and it’s a battle sometimes. Allow me to rewrite my first sentence, please, so it makes a little sense:

    The “Mediterranean” look to which you refer I’ve always coined as “Conquistador Moderne”, and it’s one I detest.

    Ronn.

  2. 50sPam says:

    This whole discussion is so truly interesting. 1. Please don’t get me wrong, I don’t love colonial overdone, I like it in bites. It’s amazing how popular it was in the 50s – entire houses top to bottom brand new built to look old, as you say, Femme1, done in faux colonial. 2. Regarding the 70s, I have essentially the same aversion as most readers as these were my teenage years. You should see some of the photos of our family, I will have to dig this “famous” one up, in particular, to show how ridiculous we all looked. But even with the 70s, if you study it, immerse yourself, you can come to appreciate elements of it. 3. But all these leads to — why do these periods experience their revivals? And let me tell you – we will see the 70s wave for sure! And 4, why do certain people — like all of us — gravitate to these periods and become, yes, obsessed about the details? Finally as you say Femme1, “scarred for live by the overblown decor in which we grew up.” HEAVEN HELP our kids! I’m giving my daughter plenty with a capital P to work out on some therapist’s couch! 🙂

  3. Maggie says:

    ACCKKK! Femme1 has re-scarred me all over again! Butter churn magazine holder — my mother actually had one!

    I dunno… I don’t think even Pam’s broad-mindedness will mellow me toward that stuff. If I never see another sofa or armchair with wooden wingbacks it’ll be too soon.

    Ronn: I love your phrase “Conquistador Moderne”. A friend of mine calls it “Casa de Torquemada”. I’d forgotten about those horrifying oil-drippy birdcages. If I stumbled across the store you mention in NYC I might have to poke my eyes out.

    Sarah: I believe you’re right about the range — a Frigidaire, not a Tappan. The door seems to slide UP, not hinged at the side like the Tappan. I’m so jealous of yours! And the clock on it is so wonderful! Now I have to go explore your blog.

    …maggie

  4. Femme1 says:

    As the only teenaged girl in our large apartment complex, I made a bit of money babysitting. I’ll never forget the apartment of one couple; Luigi di Boni, are you still on the planet? Definitely ‘Casa de Torquemada’ styling. I’d put the kids to bed, then put the Herb Alpert “Taste of Honey” LP on their huge knobby Mediterranean stereo.

    Sexy apartment…yeah.

  5. Scott Mercer says:

    Yes, this reminds in a big way of the house where I grew up, built in 1965.

    White formica counters with gold flecks, Rust/Brown refrigerator and stove, dark walnut cabinets with round “cast-iron look” knobs. My dad tried for cutting edge. There was a built-blender in the counter, and a built in wall radio/intercom system, but he didn’t put in any air conditioning! D’Oh! I seem to recall we had the brands backwards…like we had a Hotpoint refrigerator and a Frigidaire stove.

    Let’s not forget the avocado green washer/dryer (Maytag), the olive green deep pile carpet (only in the room “for company”, hardwood or tile everywhere else), indoor front entry hall bubbling fountain with plastic plants, oak wall paneling, and hanging mock Tiffany lamps.

    The house was definitely Colonial revival, two story, with attached garage, full basement, and cedar shake siding.

  6. Dan says:

    I am looking for some pivot hinges from some older “St Charles” Cabinets.

    If I have too I might even buy some OLD “St. Charles” Cabinets but really only need some of those hinges. They are like a burnished brass finish.

    Please some one let me know where I can get!

    Thank you,
    Dan

  7. jack says:

    Does anyone have a Tappan Fabulous 400 for sale. I need One to replace my dad;s he is 88 years old and stays home and cooks most of the day. this would be a great gift for him. thanks contact me jack guitar1@att.net or call me 828-273-1809

    1. sandra aleksandrowicz says:

      Hi Bob, I’m also looking for a replacement for my mom’s Tappan Fabulous 400 Gas Range. If you know of anyone else, could you let me know? Thanks, Sandy

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