The cast iron laundry room sinks by Kohler: Gorgeous. And I discovered 7 of them — available in a wide variety of colors and faucet configurations — to ogle. Yes: Laundry room porn. You could also use these sinks in your utility room, mudroom, potting area or craft room.

The chief difference between a kitchen sink and laundry room sink is that the latter is deeper — usually 12″, sometimes even more. I love these Kohler designs because they are cast iron, finished with porcelain enamel (like our kitchen sink favorite, the Kohler Delafield). The real, old fashioned deal. Among the seven designs, some have an early 20th century feel, like the Kohler Harborview sink, above. It’s a 48″ wide behemoth that comes in either a one- or two-faucet configuration.

Others cast iron sinks in the lineup have a more midcentury look, like the Kohler Bayview sink, above. You can also get this one with a faucet hole on top.

Yes, this one makes me wish I had a space for a floor sink. I guess I would use it to give Astro showers? The Kohler Oceanview sink is 48″ wide and 7″ deep. It can also be installed as a countertop sink. I love cast iron sinks.

This Kohler Park Falls sink might actually be the most practical for the space I have in mind for my crafting sink. It’s only 21″ front to back. This one is tile-in. The Park Falls also comes with a countertop drop-in design.

kohler-river-falls-sinkThe Kohler River Falls is similarly sized. All these sinks seem to be available in a variety of colors and hole and mounting configurations. If you are truly interested, study and compare all the specifications and features carefully. ‘Til your eyes bug out.

The Glen Falls is about the same, compact size as well. Kohler also offers a few under-counter cast iron utility sinks.

The Kohler Tandem laundry sink is contemporary and cute as a button. It comes with a variety of accessories so that you can wash your delicates more easily.

Can these also be used as kitchen sinks? Be careful: My experience with very deep kitchen sinks is that they are back-breakers. It’s okay to have a deep utility sink — it gives you lots of depth to wash out buckets as well as all your other tools. But if you were to use a sink like this in the kitchen, you would sort of have to “bend down” to get to the bottom all the time. So, check the depth of the sink you are considering. Note: The Harborview (first sink shown) is “only 10” deep; that would be fine for a kitchen, I think.

I have heard of folks putting kitchen sinks in the bathroom — so they give the babies their baths. Hmmm…. Juust wash the baby in the kitchen sink — that’s what we did.

Finally, don’t flip out too much at the retail prices you see on the Kohler website. Just tapping around the www a bit, I see these marketed at 50% less at major online retailers. It pays to shop around — assuming you get the customer service required.

  1. marta says:

    Pam, I was just playing around on the site where I found a sample of my sink, thisoldtubandsink.com (which is in Boston, as it turns out), and they’ve announced since so many people visiting the site comment about wishing they lived close enough for pick-up, because they could swing the price of the sink but not the shipping, the company is starting a nation wide want-ad service so people with and without vintage sinks/tubs/toilets can find each other in their local area. It’s starting this month.

  2. Neva Warnock says:

    SO glad to see I’m not the only one around here who grew with cement “set tubs”! What didn’t we use those for — indestructible! My 20 yrs old washer spews more water than my pipes can handle, so I’m looking at a utility sink to handle the overflow end route. I *just barely* have space for a 24“ sink, I believe. Unless any of you have other solutions…. 🙂

  3. Kathy says:

    I like the River Falls Model. It comes with a fitted plastic tub and wire rack, so half the sink is still usable while your clothes are soaking, and there is less risk of damage. Would be perfect for my bathroom/laundry room combination.

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