counter top edges

In this morning’s story showing a complete 1953 catalog of GE Textolite laminate, we noted this graphic showing the variety of ways that a homemaker could edge her kitchen counter tops in 1953. It’s nice to have this “authentic” historical record. I count 10 ways to edge a laminate counter top — and point you to stories we have done about where you can find the materials today to recreate these looks:

edges-countertops

Edges for round or square edges:

  1. Round corner — edged with the same laminate you use for the counter top. Can be tricky to get metal edging to bend, though.
  2. Tee nosing of flat extruded aluminum — To edge a rounded corner with metal trim, you must use a tee-molding.  Eagle Aluminum is generally my go-to place for aluminum tee-moldings, because they are an advertiser here and because they specialize in metal trims. Other sources could include Heffrons.com (also an advertiser), New York Metals, Outwater Plastics, Bars & Booths.
  3. Tee nosing fluted and colored aluminum — Eagle Aluminum has some fluted designs, as do the other suppliers noted above. Note: I know of NO vendors of kitchen counter top-sized edging into which you can slide colored strips of vinyl, or what have you. Bars & Booths has one, but it’s quite wide/high — 3″ high. That’s okay for a diner style table, but way too tall for a kitchen counter top.
  4. Postforming outside bend — Postforming simply means “curved with heat” — the counter top maker needs to do this for you.

Edges for square corners only:

  1. Square corner — I think that all they are referring to here is using the laminate itself as an edge.
  2. Textolite edge — I don’t understand the difference here vs. above. But from the illustration, it appear Textolite must have had a special crisp edge as part of the laminate manufacture, which itself could be considered a design option. This is kind of ironic — because today, laminate manufacturers are going all out to try and minimize any seams at all and to replicate the look of marble and granite and the like with their postformed edges.
  3. Wood edge flush — I don’t have a specific source. I *think* this type of wood edging is pretty common.
  4. Stainless steel edge — New York Metal is the only place I know of with stainless steel edging. I used this in my kitchen, and continue to adore it. Here’s my story on the pieces I used.
  5. Aluminum edge — Eagle Aluminum is my go-to place, because they are an advertiser here and because they specialize in metal trims. Other sources could include Heffrons.com (also an advertiser), New York Metals, Outwater Plastics, Bars & Booths.
  6. Aluminum plain or decorated — I do not know of any suppliers with an aluminum edge with a profile this pronounced.

Thanks to the Building Technology Heritage Library and archive.org for making this catalog available via creative commons license.

More tips on counter tops and edging:

CategoriesCountertops
  1. pam kueber says:

    I don’t know where to get this… Perhaps you can purchase some vinyl of the proper thickness and cut your own strips?

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